A Surprising Twist: Can Erectile Dysfunction Pills Help Lower Blood Pressure?

Welcome to another fascinating deep-dive into the world of health and wellness! Today, we’re exploring an unexpected topic that has been gaining traction among medical professionals and health enthusiasts: the possible relationship between erectile dysfunction (ED) pills and blood pressure management. Intrigued? You should be! Let’s get to the heart of this matter and see if this surprising connection can help millions of people worldwide.

A Tale of Two Conditions:

Erectile dysfunction affects millions of men globally, causing both physical and emotional distress. On the other hand, high blood pressure, or hypertension, is a silent killer that often goes unnoticed until it causes life-threatening complications. As it turns out, these two seemingly unrelated conditions have more in common than you might think..

ED Pills: Not Just for Romance

When we think of erectile dysfunction pills, medications like Viagra (sildenafil), Cialis (tadalafil), and Levitra (vardenafil) likely come to mind. These popular drugs, known as phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors, work by increasing blood flow to the penis, thus facilitating an erection. But their impact on the body doesn’t stop there. Some researchers have noticed that these pills might also have beneficial effects on blood pressure.

The Science Behind the Connection:

The secret behind the ED pill-blood pressure link lies in the mechanism of action of PDE5 inhibitors. By relaxing smooth muscle cells in blood vessels, these drugs allow for increased blood flow not only to the penis but also throughout the body. This can lead to a temporary reduction in blood pressure, which can be helpful for some individuals with hypertension. However, it’s essential to understand that this effect is not a long-term solution and should not replace prescribed blood pressure medications.

Proceed with Caution:

While the connection between ED pills and blood pressure reduction is exciting, it’s crucial to approach this potential treatment with caution. Combining ED pills with blood pressure medications, particularly nitrates, can lead to dangerously low blood pressure levels. Always consult your healthcare provider before making any changes to your treatment plan.

In conclusion, the link between erectile dysfunction pills and blood pressure management is an intriguing one, opening the door for further research and possibly new treatment options in the future. However, it’s essential to remember that ED pills should not be considered a substitute for proper hypertension management, and self-medication is not advisable. As always, consult your doctor before making any changes to your medications or health regimen.

Stay tuned for more interesting health news and discoveries! And remember, knowledge is power – especially when it comes to your well-being. 

Order tests, access on-demand telehealth, and get treatment delivered right to your door by downloading the Cue Health App, or visiting our website.

This information is presented in summary form, general in nature, and for informational purposes only. Content is not intended nor recommended to substitute for professional medical advice. For personal medical advice, always consult your doctor or other qualified healthcare professional. The tests offered are subject to change and subject to availability. Due to state restrictions, this Cue Product is not available for individuals located in the state of New York. Other state restrictions may apply for specific tests. Please refer to our support page for detailed product terms and conditions.

References: 

  1. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/erectile-dysfunction/symptoms-causes/syc-20355776
  2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK562253/
  3. https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/hypertension#:~:text=Hypertension%20(high%20blood%20pressure)%20is,get%20your%20blood%20pressure%20checked.
  4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK548192/#:~:text=The%20phosphodiesterase%20type%205%20
  5. https://www.nbcnews.com/health/mens-health/viagra-nitrates-dont-mix-are-men-still-taking-both-rcna24788
 

Addressing the Rise of Colon Cancer in Young Adults

A new study by the American Association for Cancer Research recently found that a startling number of people aged 20-29 are being diagnosed with late-stage colon cancer – prompting renewed calls among doctors for earlier screening. Experts are still examining what’s causing this spike in cases among young adults, but some physicians have theorized that young people are less likely to consider colon cancer as a potential diagnosis because preventative screening isn’t typically recommended until age 45. This could delay diagnosis in young people, increasing the likelihood of advanced-stage cancer.

Moving forward, young people concerned about their susceptibility to these types of cancers should educate themselves on any notable warning signs and the steps needed to address them. Here’s a brief overview of what you need to know.

Signs and Symptoms of Colorectal Cancer

The most common physical symptoms associated with colorectal cancer are persistent abdominal pain, rectal bleeding, a change in bowel habits, weight loss and unexpected weakness. While our risk increases as we age, other notable variables may play a role in a person’s likelihood of contracting this form of cancer, including (but not limited to) diet, exercise and smoking.

Unfortunately, because colorectal cancer has historically been associated with older adults, younger patients are more likely to write these signs off as less-serious conditions. Accordingly, if you experience any of the above symptoms – especially for an extended period of time – be sure to ask your gastroenterologist about definitively ruling out colorectal cancer.

The Importance of Testing for Colorectal Cancer

Thankfully, patients with troubling gastrointestinal symptoms don’t need to immediately schedule costly and invasive diagnostic procedures such as a colonoscopy. In fact, a fecal immunochemical test (FIT) is often the best first step for getting diagnosed with or ruling out colorectal cancer. This test is conducted by detecting blood in the stool and, consequently, the digestive tract – which is a symptom of colorectal cancer that often goes undetected.

For adults both young and old, getting a FIT can be incredibly beneficial in spotting precancerous polyps or, worse, more advanced stages of colorectal cancer. Should you receive a positive test result, you should then work with your doctor to schedule a follow-up colonoscopy, which is a necessary step toward a correct diagnosis.

It’s Time for Young Adults to Take Charge of Their Health

Of course, for many people, getting an intestinal exam and discussing their bowel habits in-person can be an uncomfortable process – even with a trained medical professional. The good news is that there are virtual care and at-home testing options, such as Cue® Health’s new Fecal Immunochemical Test (FIT), that can put people at ease – at least in the early diagnostic stages. By understanding the warning signs and taking preventative steps to catch red flags before they progress, young adults can take the power of testing into their own hands and improve their digestive health in the process.

This information is presented in summary form, general in nature, and for informational purposes only. Content is not intended nor recommended to substitute for professional medical advice. For personal medical advice, always consult your doctor or other qualified healthcare professional. The tests offered are subject to change and subject to availability. Due to state restrictions, this Cue Product is not available for individuals located in the state of New York. Other state restrictions may apply for specific tests. Please refer to our support page for detailed product terms and conditions.

References: 

  1. https://aacrjournals.org/cebp/article/31/2/334/678485/Shifts-in-the-Proportion-of-Distant-Stage-Early
  2. https://abcnews.go.com/Health/young-people-colon-cancer-high-rates-doctors-highlight/story?id=82468484
  3. https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/colorectal/basic_info/risk_factors.htm
  4. https://www.ccalliance.org/screening-prevention/screening-methods/fecal-immunochemical-test

With STDs in Women on the Rise: Why Prevention Is More Important than Ever

In the U.S., an estimated one in five people have a sexually transmitted infection (STI) – highlighting the burden of STIs in America. In 2021 alone, there were 2.5 million reported cases of syphilis, gonorrhea and chlamydia, according to preliminary data by the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). 

As the prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) continues to rise, education, screening, treatment and management has never been more important. 

Who Is Most Affected?

For numerous reasons, such as being more biologically vulnerable, females have a greater chance of getting STIs than men. For instance, in comparison to heterosexual males, women are 1.7 times more likely to get chlamydia and 2.8 times more likely to get gonorrhea. Younger age also plays a factor in both genders, as almost half of all new infections occur in people ages 15-24. 

Understanding your individual risk factors is key to making informed decisions to support your sexual health. 

What Are Common Symptoms?

Because some STIs don’t have symptoms, it can be hard to know if you are infected, which is why many people are unaware that they may be passing an infection onto their sexual partner(s). However, some STIs, such as chlamydia may present with symptoms such as painful urination, lower abdominal pain, bleeding between periods in women and testicular pain in men. Because some of these symptoms, such as painful urination, mimic conditions similar to a urinary tract infection in women, they can be easily missed – which is one of many reasons why prevention is so important. 

Always speak with your doctor if you’re experiencing symptoms of an STI or if you’ve been with a partner who is. 

The Importance of Prevention & Testing:

For those who are sexually active, correct and consistent use of barrier methods of birth control, such as male and female condoms, can help reduce the risk of contracting an STI. If you notice any signs or symptoms of an STD, it’s important to get tested right away, particularly because an infection can cause other health issues, such as STI-related infertility

At Cue, we recognize that stigma surrounding STIs is one of the reasons why people prevent and delay testing. However, detection and treatment of STIs is incredibly important for one’s health. For this reason and more, we’re now offering a test in order to provide a discrete and convenient at-home testing option to help women put their sexual health back in their own hands. 

To learn more about which STDs and how often you should get tested, the CDC has outlined a helpful STD testing recommendations guide. 

This information is presented in summary form, general in nature, and for informational purposes only. Content is not intended nor recommended to substitute for professional medical advice. For personal medical advice, always consult your doctor or other qualified healthcare professional. The tests offered are subject to change and subject to availability. Due to state restrictions, this Cue Product is not available for individuals located in the state of New York. Other state restrictions may apply for specific tests. Please refer to our support page for detailed product terms and conditions.

References: 

  1. https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2021/p0125-sexualy-transmitted-infection.html
  2. https://fortune.com/well/2022/09/20/std-rates-rising-cdc-data/
  3. https://www.verywellhealth.com/facts-about-stis-5442984
  4. https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/sexual-health/basics/std-prevention/hlv-20049432
  5. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/sexually-transmitted-diseases-stds/in-depth/std-symptoms/art-20047081
  6. https://www.verywellhealth.com/can-an-std-cause-infertility-3133182
  7. https://www.cdc.gov/std/prevention/screeningreccs.htm

The Silent STD: Identifying and Treating Chlamydia

In the United States alone, almost 1.6 million cases of chlamydia were reported in 2020 – making it the number most commonly reported STI. Unfortunately, despite statistics like these, many people remain unaware of the potential risk factors and the importance of early detection. Why? Because for many, chlamydia often comes with few, if any symptoms, to monitor – underscoring the need for regular testing in order to confirm your status and outline a treatment plan with your doctor. 

What are the symptoms?

Although symptoms often don’t present themselves, chlamydia can result in medical complications, which is why early detection and treatment is so important. If symptoms occur, such as abnormal vaginal discharge or a burning sensation when peeing in women, or discharge from the penis, pain and swelling in one or both testicles in men, getting tested and treated as soon as possible is essential to one’s health, as chlamydia can lead to other serious health implications. Always speak with your doctor if you think you may have chlamydia or if you’ve been with a partner who has. Once you spot symptoms and get tested to confirm a positive diagnosis, your doctor will likely prescribe you with antibiotics, which take approximately seven days to treat effectively. 

Are you at risk?

Anyone who is sexually active – outside those in monogamous relations with a partner who does not have chlamydia – is at risk of getting the disease. Young individuals, in particular, have a higher risk of getting chlamydia due to biological factors as well as behaviors. 

Regular chlamydia screenings are recommended for those who are under 25 and sexually active, men who have sex with men, have HIV, plan to have sex with a new partner or have more than one partner, along with other scenarios

Why get tested? 

Not only is getting tested for chlamydia essential to your own health, but it also plays an important role in limiting the spread of this disease to others. Understanding your risk factors, getting tested and knowing your STD status are a few ways that you can best protect yourself from health complications associated with chlamydia. At Cue®, we know that many people delay seeking care for sexually transmitted diseases, such as chlamydia for a range of reasons, including associated stigma, lack of accessibility, convenience and more. With this in mind, we’re on a mission to provide easy access to STD testing in order to empower people to make personalized, proactive, and informed healthcare decisions. For more information on our efforts in this space, click here.

This information is presented in summary form, general in nature, and for informational purposes only. Content is not intended nor recommended to substitute for professional medical advice. For personal medical advice, always consult your doctor or other qualified healthcare professional. The tests offered are subject to change and subject to availability. Due to state restrictions, this Cue Product is not available for individuals located in the state of New York. Other state restrictions may apply for specific tests. Please refer to our support page for detailed product terms and conditions.

References: 

  1. https://www.americashealthrankings.org/explore/measures/chlamydia
  2. https://www.plannedparenthood.org/learn/stds-hiv-safer-sex/chlamydia/chlamydia-symptoms
  3. https://www.cdc.gov/std/chlamydia/stdfact-chlamydia.htm
  4. https://www.cdc.gov/std/chlamydia/treatment.htm
  5. https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diagnostics/22352-chlamydia-test

Vitamin D Deficiency Spreading Around the World: Here’s What We Can Do About It

Nearly one billion people have a vitamin D deficiency worldwide, equating to 35% of adults in the United States. Take a moment to let these statistics sink in. With such a large portion of the global population deficient in this necessary vitamin, many people simply aren’t getting the proper nutrients (e.g., calcium and phosphorus) they need to protect their overall health, leading to potential complications in their bones, muscles and immune system. Through regular testing, however, individuals can finally change their Vitamin D levels for the better – identifying any red flags and taking the steps needed to correct them. 

What is Vitamin D? 

Not only is vitamin D a nutrient that we eat, it’s also a hormone that our bodies make. Without a sufficient amount of vitamin D, bones can become soft, thin and brittle, which is why making sure you consume an ample amount of vitamin D – either through sunlight, food or supplements – is of the utmost importance. The Mayo Clinic recommends foods such as fatty fish like salmon, tuna and halibut, as well as fortified foods like milk and yogurt, all of which have high amounts of vitamin D.

What are common symptoms of a deficiency?

Anyone from infants to children and adults can have a vitamin D deficiency. Common symptoms include fatigue, bone pain, depression, not sleeping well, hair loss, loss of appetite, muscle weakness and more. 

Why does this deficiency happen? 

There are a wide range of reasons why a vitamin D deficiency can occur. For instance, sunlight is one source of vitamin D, so if you spend a lot of time indoors or if you live somewhere where sunlight is absent at certain times of the year, then your vitamin D production may decrease. On the contrary, for those who spend time outdoors in the sunlight, while sunscreen is an important tool to protect your skin, it can also decrease vitamin D production.  

A vitamin D deficiency can also occur if you aren’t getting enough vitamin D in your diet or if your body isn’t properly absorbing or using vitamin D. Other medical conditions, including obesity, kidney disease, liver disease, celiac disease and more can all play a role when it comes to vitamin D deficiency. 

Vitamin D and Vitamin K: 

Interestingly, recent research suggests that vitamin D and vitamin K should be taken together in order to promote healthy bones. Vitamin K – which often occurs in leafy greens such as spinach and kale – works in tandem with vitamin D to promote bone health and protect your heart.  

Overcoming a vitamin D deficiency: 

Thankfully, increasing your vitamin D is possible through sun exposure, food and nutritional supplements. Knowing if you are deficient in vitamin D is the first step to making lifestyle changes that can help, which is why testing is so valuable. At Cue, we’re working to reinvent how we interact with our health, which is why we’re bringing at-home testing solutions – such as vitamin D – to people across the United States. As vitamin D deficiency continues to be an issue for many, real time and accurate testing has never been more important.

This information is presented in summary form, general in nature, and for informational purposes only. Content is not intended nor recommended to substitute for professional medical advice. For personal medical advice, always consult your doctor or other qualified healthcare professional. The tests offered are subject to change and subject to availability. Due to state restrictions, this Cue Product is not available for individuals located in the state of New York. Other state restrictions may apply for specific tests. Please refer to our support page for detailed product terms and conditions.

References:

  1. https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases/15050-vitamin-d-vitamin-d-deficiency
  2. https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/vitamin-d/
  3. https://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplements-vitamin-d/art-20363792
  4. https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/expert-answers/vitamin-d-deficiency/faq-20058397#
  5. https://www.nebraskamed.com/primary-care/9-vitamin-d-deficiency-symptoms-and-11-high-vitamin-d-foods

Signs and Causes of Infertility: Why Early Diagnosis Can Improve Patient Outcomes

Infertility is a widespread global health issue that impacts approximately 186 million individuals of reproductive age worldwide. In the United States alone, one in five heterosexual women aged 15 to 49 years with no prior births are unable to get pregnant after one year of trying – with 26% experiencing trouble carrying a pregnancy to term (impaired fecundity).

For many people, getting diagnosed with infertility can be incredibly taxing (both physically and emotionally), regardless of gender, sexual orientation or age. If you’re thinking about starting a family, it’s important to familiarize yourself with the facts and test for infertility early to mitigate the most stressful aspects of the process.

Here’s everything you should know about testing, getting diagnosed with and living with infertility.

Signs and Causes of Infertility in Women

Unfortunately, there aren’t many noticeable symptoms of infertility, and many women only discover their fertility issues when they’re ready to have a baby. That said, however, having a history of conditions such as endometriosis, irregular periods, pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy and cystic fibrosis can predispose you to the condition. In the female reproductive system, infertility may be caused by a range of abnormalities in the ovaries, uterus, fallopian tubes or endocrine system – which may be inherited or caused by a pelvic or hormonal disorder.

Early Diagnosis is Key

If you’re curious about whether you have infertility, the only surefire way to know is to get tested. By doing so months or years before you’re ready to have children, you can mitigate any surprise or frustration associated with their status and take the time they need to pursue potential treatment options. Therapies for infertility may include lifestyle adjustments, medications, hormone therapy, surgery, sperm or egg donation, intrauterine insemination (IUI) and in-vitro fertilization (IVF).

Regardless of your treatment regimen, it will be important to regularly consult your doctor to track your fertility metrics and adapt treatment plans accordingly. If you prefer to conduct these tests in private, at-home testing can be a great alternative for ongoing monitoring. At Cue® Health, we’re committed to empowering patients to take charge of their own health – and testing for infertility is no exception. With this in mind, we currently offer a lab-quality infertility panel with a virtual care option that can help you better understand your infertility and the steps needed to address it. Visit our infertility panel page for more information.

This information is presented in summary form, general in nature, and for informational purposes only. Content is not intended nor recommended to substitute for professional medical advice. For personal medical advice, always consult your doctor or other qualified healthcare professional. The tests offered are subject to change and subject to availability. Due to state restrictions, this Cue Product is not available for individuals located in the state of New York. Other state restrictions may apply for specific tests. Please refer to our support page for detailed product terms and conditions.

References:

  1. https://www.who.int/health-topics/infertility
  2. https://www.plannedparenthood.org/learn/pregnancy/infertility/should-my-partner-and-i-get-tested-infertility
  3. https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/infertility
  4. https://www.plannedparenthood.org/learn/pregnancy/fertility-treatments
  5. https://www.plannedparenthood.org/learn/pregnancy/fertility-treatments/what-iui
  6. https://www.plannedparenthood.org/learn/pregnancy/fertility-treatments/what-ivf

The Decline of the Condom: Why STD Testing Is More Important Than Ever

For many of us, it’s been quite some time since we took a sexual education class. The truth is: It’s important to occasionally revisit these important topics we learned in school. Especially now, since federal family-planning surveys show that condoms – one of the best contraceptive methods for preventing the spread of sexually transmitted infections and diseases – went from the most used contraceptive among 75% of men in 2011 to just 42% of men in 2021.

As a result of these concerning trends and more, there has been a staggering increase in sexual transmitted infections (STIs) and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in the United States – with 2.5 million total infections in 2021, up from an already record-breaking 2.4 million in 2020. What’s more, syphilis rates shot up by 26% – the highest rate since the 1950s – with HIV cases rising by 16%, gonorrhea by 2.8% and chlamydia by 3%

With condom use declining, here’s everything you need to know about preventing various STDs and the importance of getting tested.

STD Preventative Care

Although cases of STDs are on the rise, it’s important to know that most are preventable. In fact, there are several ways to protect your sexual health including abstinence, vaccination (especially in the cases of HPV and mpox), mutual monogamy, reducing your amount of sex partners and using condoms. Correct and consistent use of this contraceptive every time you engage in anal, vaginal or oral sex is highly effective at keeping you and your partner(s) safe since it provides a barrier between bodily fluids – the vehicle through which STDs spread. Note that no protective measure except for abstinence is 100% effective at preventing STDs and that getting tested is just as important.

Getting Tested for STDs

Even if you follow the protective measures outlined above, getting tested is a critical step in stopping STD transmission. Some STDs, such as chlamydia, may not show symptoms for months or years and cause serious long-term health issues. Consider having an open and honest conversation with your doctor and your sexual partner(s) before and after testing. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has published the following STD testing guidelines:

  • All adults between the ages of 13 and 64 should be tested at least once for HIV.
  • All sexually active men who have sex with men (or people assigned male at birth) should be tested:
    • Once a year for syphilis, chlamydia and gonorrhea
    • Every three to six months for syphilis, chlamydia and gonorrhea if they have multiple or anonymous partners
    • At least once a year for HIV
    • At least once a year for Hepatitis C if living with HIV.
  • Anyone who engages in behaviors that could place them at risk for infection (e.g., needle-sharing) should get tested for HIV at least once per year.
  • Anyone who has had oral or anal sex should consider throat and rectal testing options.

Leandro Mena, director of the CDC’s Division of STD Prevention said it best: “It is imperative that we rebuild, innovate and expand STD prevention in the U.S.” That’s why we developed our complete Men’s Sexual Health panel designed to empower you to get lab-quality testing for STDs and STIs from the comfort and privacy of home. Together, we can stop the spread of these burdensome diseases and create a healthier future for all.

This information is presented in summary form, general in nature, and for informational purposes only. Content is not intended nor recommended to substitute for professional medical advice. For personal medical advice, always consult your doctor or other qualified healthcare professional. The tests offered are subject to change and subject to availability. Due to state restrictions, this Cue® Product is not available for individuals located in the state of New York. Other state restrictions may apply for specific tests. Please refer to our support page for detailed product terms and conditions.

References: 

  1. https://www.washingtonpost.com/health/2022/11/23/stds-rise-chlamydia-syphilis-condom-use/
  2. https://www.axios.com/2022/09/20/std-increase-prevention-cdc
  3. https://www.cdc.gov/std/prevention/default.htm
  4. https://www.healthline.com/health/healthy-sex/what-stds-do-condoms-not-prevent#how-it-happens
  5. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/sti-testing
  6. https://www.cdc.gov/std/prevention/screeningreccs.htm

90% of People with Kidney Disease Don’t Know They Have It: It’s Time to Change This

Today, kidney disease affects an estimated 37 million people in the United States – representing 15% of the adult population and more than one in seven people. What is even more staggering is the fact that 90% of those with kidney disease, including two in five people with severe kidney disease, do not even know that they have it. As the fastest-growing noncommunicable disease in the U.S., kidney disease is often a silent killer, making early detection critical in improving patient outcomes.

Below, here’s a brief background of the kidneys, with a substantive overview of their function and the steps needed to protect them.

Understanding Your Kidneys
Every day, your kidneys filter a staggering 200 liters (nearly 53 gallons) of blood and are an important vehicle for removing waste, balancing fluids and minerals, controlling blood pressure and creating red blood cells. Unfortunately, kidney disease can disrupt these vital daily functions, potentially leading to serious complications such as heart attack, stroke, anemia, nerve damage, kidney failure and even death.

Today, as many as one in three adults is at risk for developing kidney disease due to risk factors such as diabetes, high blood pressure, advanced age (60+ years) and family history. When first impacted with the disease, patients typically begin experiencing a number of early warning signs, which include persistent puffiness around the eyes, frequent urination, foamy urine, dry and itchy skin, fatigue and trouble concentrating. However, many often fail to attribute these symptoms to their kidneys, causing their disease to become more advanced and, consequently, more harmful. 

Protecting Your Renal Health

Thankfully, there are several different ways to protect the health of your kidneys. For example, limiting salt and fat in your diet, drinking plenty of water, keeping your blood pressure in check, exercising regularly and quitting smoking have all been shown to reduce the risk of kidney disease. What’s more, testing has been shown to be an incredibly powerful tool for protecting renal health, arming individuals with the information they need to address their kidney function. Our recently released Cue® Health Kidney Panel is a great option for those who prefer to test from the privacy and comfort of their home. We believe strongly that checking your kidney function today could help save your life tomorrow. Accordingly, be sure to talk to your doctor if you believe you might be at risk for kidney disease – taking the steps necessary to protect against this debilitating and elusive disease.

This information is presented in summary form, general in nature, and for informational purposes only. Content is not intended nor recommended to substitute for professional medical advice. For personal medical advice, always consult your doctor or other qualified healthcare professional. The tests offered are subject to change and subject to availability. Due to state restrictions, this Cue Product is not available for individuals located in the state of New York. Other state restrictions may apply for specific tests. Please refer to our support page for detailed product terms and conditions.

References: 

  1. https://www.kidney.org/news/newsroom/fsindex#fast-facts
  2. https://www.kidneyfund.org/all-about-kidneys/quick-kidney-disease-facts-and-stats
  3. https://www.kidney.org/yourkidneysandyou

Why Regular Screenings Are a Critical First Line of Defense for Your Heart Health

Each year, 17.9 million people die from cardiovascular disease (CVD), making this group of disorders the leading cause of death globally. Disorders that fall under CVD – which affect your heart and blood vessels – include coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, peripheral arterial disease and more. In the U.S. alone, nearly half of all adults have at least one form of heart disease, underscoring the importance of continued monitoring and measurement.

What Signs Should I Look Out For?

Fortunately, there are ways to support your heart health and prevent heart disease, such as by maintaining a healthy weight, getting good quality sleep, managing stress, exercising, eating a heart healthy diet and getting regular screenings. Key screening tests related to CVD include blood pressure, cholesterol, body weight / body mass index, blood glucose, and discussions surrounding smoking, physical activity and diet. 

When Should I Start Checking My Heart Health? 

According to the American Heart Association, screenings such as body weight and blood pressure should begin at age 20. However, depending on one’s individual risk level, the frequency of follow up will vary. Most likely, other screenings related to heart health will begin later in life. It’s important to discuss your individual risk factors and screening frequency with your doctor. 

However, it’s never too late to get your heart health checked, and when it comes to detecting cardiovascular disease, the sooner the better. By getting regular heart screenings, you will be better positioned to detect conditions or diseases early, reduce your chances of becoming ill, get the right treatment, improve your overall health and more. 

At-Home Testing in the Palm of Your Hand

At Cue, our goal is to revolutionize how people access care in order to empower individuals to live healthier lives. Recognizing the importance of regular heart health screenings, we recently released a new at-home heart panel test that will help you understand your risk for CVD. In doing so, our hope is that we can help prevent and increase early detection of CVD and in turn, drive better outcomes. 

This information is presented in summary form, general in nature, and for informational purposes only. Content is not intended nor recommended to substitute for professional medical advice. For personal medical advice, always consult your doctor or other qualified healthcare professional. The tests offered are subject to change and subject to availability. Due to state restrictions, this Cue Product is not available for individuals located in the state of New York. Other state restrictions may apply for specific tests. Please refer to our support page for detailed product terms and conditions.

References: 

  1. https://www.who.int/health-topics/cardiovascular-diseases
  2. https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/cardiovascular-diseases-(cvds)
  3. https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases/21493-cardiovascular-disease
  4. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/heart-disease/in-depth/heart-disease-prevention/art-20046502
  5. https://www.heart.org/en/health-topics/consumer-healthcare/what-is-cardiovascular-disease/heart-health-screenings
  6. https://www.healthline.com/health/heart-health/scheduling-heart-health-checkup
  7. https://amscardiology.com/the-importance-of-routine-heart-check-ups/
 

Half the World has the Herpes Simplex Virus: Why It’s Important to Get Tested

Herpes simplex virus, or HSV, falls into two groups: HSV-1 and HSV-2. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), globally, several billion people are living with HSV-1 and half a billion people are living with HSV-2. Given the number of people worldwide who have one form of the herpes simplex virus, ongoing education surrounding these two viruses can play a role in reducing future infections. 

What is HSV-1?

HSV-1 is a virus that leads to cold sores on or around the mouth. Most often, people get HSV-1 during childhood or young adulthood from non-sexual contact with saliva. HSV-1 symptoms can occur periodically, and frequency of sores varies from person to person. In terms of treatment, antiviral medications along with over-the-counter topical remedies can help. 

What is HSV-2?

HSV-2, on the other hand, is a sexually transmitted disease that causes genital herpes. The infection can spread through a herpes sore, genital fluids from a partner with a genital herpes infection, saliva from a partner with an oral herpes infection, and more. Because many people have no or mild symptoms, they often are unaware that they have a herpes infection. 

The Importance of Testing for HSV-2:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends testing for HSV-2 for individuals who are experiencing genital symptoms – such as an “outbreak” that causes blisters – to confirm if they have it. Although there is currently no cure for HSV-2, there are medicines that can help sores heal during an outbreak, lower the frequency of recurrent outbreaks, lessen the severity and duration of symptoms in recurrent outbreaks and reduce the chance of passing the virus to a partner. 

Because there is no cure for HSV-2, better treatment and prevention options are needed to promote and prevent health worldwide. For people who are experiencing symptoms, access to a timely diagnosis is important for not only supporting one’s health, but also for reducing the risk of passing it onto another person. At Cue, we are committed to providing fast, accurate at-home testing and closed-loop care – helping individuals routinely monitor and manage their health from wherever, whenever.

This information is presented in summary form, general in nature, and for informational purposes only. Content is not intended nor recommended to substitute for professional medical advice. For personal medical advice, always consult your doctor or other qualified healthcare professional. The tests offered are subject to change and subject to availability. Due to state restrictions, this Cue Product is not available for individuals located in the state of New York. Other state restrictions may apply for specific tests. Please refer to our support page for detailed product terms and conditions.

References:

  1. https://www.who.int/news/item/01-05-2020-massive-proportion-world-population-living-with-herpes-infection
  2. https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/herpes-simplex-virus
  3. https://www.cdc.gov/std/herpes/stdfact-herpes.htm
  4. https://www.cdc.gov/std/herpes/screening.htm
  5. https://www.cdc.gov/std/herpes/stdfact-herpes.htm
  6. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/genital-herpes/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20356167